Saturday, August 10, 2013

Rock candy Experiment


This experiment is still in process, check back later for updates.

Kids love candy, I mean what kid doesn't? So how could I make candy part of a learning experience? Well a few good ideas came to mind, but the one that stood out the most was Rock Candy.

Rock Candy is fun to make because you don't get instant gratification, instead over time you see these crystals growing out of seemingly nothing into this beautiful yet seductively sweet prize, and the kids have learned about Chemistry and Earth Science without even knowing it.

To make rock candy you need a good amount of sugar, roughly 1 lb for every 2 cups of solution, this is because you need to make what is called a super saturated solution.
In Chemistry we learn that all solvents, things we dissolve other things into, have a point at which they can no longer dissolve the solute, what we put into the solvent to dissolve, when this happens it is called a saturated solution.  However, to go from a saturated solution, to a super saturated solution we need to temporarily change the solubility, how well the solvent can dissolve the solute, we do this in a sugar/water solution by raising the temperature of the water to boiling. Once the water boiling we continue to add sugar until it can no longer dissolve the sugar, leaving us with yet another saturated solution. As the sugar/water solution cools to room temperature the water's solubility returns to its original proponents, creating a super saturated solution.  The excess dissolved sugar has no choice but to revert, meaning change back, into crystal form; in chemistry we call this process precipitation, and the crystals the precipitate, what has come out of the solution in solid form.
This crystal formation is where we bring in some really fun Earth Science.  See as the water cools and evaporates the solution begins to be more and more saturated meaning that more and more of the sugar needs to leave the solution. In this attempt to leave the solution they cling to any "seed" material they can, including the sides of the container and your string/stick. As these seed crystals form they attract other sugar crystals to form atop them molecule by molecule.  Your finished rock candy will be made up of roughly a quadrillion, or a million-million, sugar molecules attached to your string/stick. These crystals should be clearly defined in monoclinic crystals, which are crystals with sharp right angles and smooth sides of various sizes. This process is similar to how crystals such as quartz are made in caves today, except this is much more tasty!


Rock Candy

Ingredients
3-5 cups sugar, more may be needed
2 cups water
food coloring, optional
candy flavoring, optional

Directions
Seed your string/stick so that crystal formation has a "preferred" place to attach.

If using string: string should be 2/3 the length of intended jar/cup depth. Wet string, roll in sugar, lay flat on a piece of wax paper to dry completely.  Dry time can take a few days, so plan in advance.

If using a stick: no prep is necessary, but seeding provides a better surface for crystal formation.  Wet stick, roll in sugar, allow to dry completely.

Heat the water in the saucepan over medium-high heat until it comes to a boil.
Pour about 1/4 cup of sugar into the boiling water, stirring until it dissolves.
Keep adding more and more sugar, each time stirring it until it dissolves, until no more will dissolve. This will take time and patience and it will take longer for the sugar to dissolve each time. Be sure you don't give up too soon. Once no more sugar will dissolve, remove it from heat. Allow to cool for 5 minutes.
Pour sugar/water solution into your container. If you wish to add flavors and colors now would be the time. Put enough food coloring in the solution, make sure you add enough coloring that the solution is many shades darker than your intended result. Add in your candy flavoring, we used 1/4-1/2 dram of flavoring oil per 2 cup container. Stir well with spoon or unseeded stick.
Gently suspend your stick/string in the solution, try to keep the stick/string from touching the bottom or sides of the container or the crystals will attach the stick/string to the container.
Cover lightly as to not slow down the evaporation process, but to keep out dust.
Place in an area where it will not be disturbed for seven days.

Feel free to check your crystal growth over the next few days, but be sure not to disturb the containers! After 7 days you should have sufficient crystal growth, remove from solution and allow to dry. 
Enjoy!
Aeries' solution after 14 hours






Safety Note:  When working with the sugar-water solution an adult should be present.  When you heat sugar to super high temperatures it can create some very nasty burns. Be safe and use the necessary safety equipment.

Saturday, April 6, 2013

Crochet Chihuahua Shrug

Finding free designs that are cute for your female chi is almost an impossible task, and I don't know about you but I hate paying $5 or more per pattern.
Here is a free pattern that I found on Ravelry as well as the woman who altered it's website, it is easily adaptable.
Chihuahua Shrug

The original dog sweater pattern was designed by Lisa Hamblin.
The pattern below is an altered version made by Linda Fleisch.

MATERIALS: 
Hook: Size G
Yarn: 4ply worsted weight yarn.
Stitches used: ch, sl st, hdc.
Difficulty: Easy (since there are no leg holes to shape)


This will fit a dog weighing between 3 and 6 pounds

Rnd 1: Using a G hook ch 40, join with sl st being careful not to twist the chain. Ch2, hdc in next ch and in ea ch around. Join with sl st in top of beg ch2. Ch 2. DO NOT TURN

Rnd 2 -7: Hdc in next st and in ea st around. Join with sl st in top of beg ch 2. CH2. DO NOT TURN

Rnd 8: Sl st in next 10 sts, ch 2, hdc in next 19 sts (20 including beg ch 2) ch 2 TURN

Rows 9-13: Hdc in ea hdc, ch 2, TURN.

Rnd 14: Hdc in ea hdc, ch 10. DO NOT TURN. Join with sl st to opposite side of row just completed, ch 2

Rnd 15: Hdc in ea st and ch around, ch 2 DO NOT TURN

Rnd 16-17: Repeat Rnd 15.

Fasten off and weave in ends.

I used a 4 ply worsted weight yarn. To make this smaller or larger use the same directions but use a smaller or larger hook. A smaller hook and sport weight yarn will make a smaller sweater also.

If one needs a longer sweater extra rows/rnds can be added in rows 9-13 and/or rnds 2-7 and/or 16-17.

If the neck part looks like it might be too tight to add a couple of chains to rnd 14.

Abbreviations:
Ch – Chain
Hdc – Half Double Crochet
Rnd – Round
Sc - Single Crochet
Sl St – Slip Stitch
Sk – Skip
St – Stitch

Crochet Visor Beanie with Stripe

Two Christmas's ago I went crochet happy and decided to make a lot of crocheted gifts. My son had lost a knitted visor beanie a few months earlier so I decided to try my hand at making a crocheted one.
A friend of mine suggested a site called Ravelry where people make and share patterns their patterns and ideas for crocheting and knitting, since learning about this site I have pinned quite a few of my projects both of my own patterns and of others which I will now post on here.

This pattern was originally posted by Suzanne Steiger on her Ravelry page

Crochet Visor Beanie with Stripe

featured stitches:
chain (ch)
slip stitch (sl st)
single crochet (sc)
single crochet decrease (sc dec)
half double crochet (hdc)

stuff you’ll need:
100% merino wool, worsted weight
1 skein of color a and 1 skein of contrasting color b.
1 hook size k/10 ½ - 6.50mm
1 hook size j/10 - 6.00mm
tapestry needle

gauge
18 stitches and 12 rows = 4” (10cm) in half double crochet with size g/6 - 4.5mm hook.

instructions
either make an adjustable ring, or ch 4 and join with sl st to make a ring.

rnd 1: 8 hdc in ring join with sl st. ch 1 (counts as 1st hdc).

rnd 2: hdc in same st. 2 hdc in ea st around to last st, join with sl st to beginning chain. 16 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnd 3: hdc in same st. *hdc in next st, 2 hdc in next st*, repeat from * to * around to last st. join with sl st to beginning chain. 24 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnd 4: hdc in same st. *1 hdc in next 2 sts, 2 hdc in next st*, repeat from * to * around to last st.
Join with sl st to beginning chain. 32 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnd 5: hdc in same st. *1 hdc in next 3 sts, 2 hdc in next st*, repeat from * to * around to last st.
Join with sl st to beginning chain. 40 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnd 6: hdc in same st. *1 hdc in next 4 sts, 2 hdc in next st*, repeat from * to * around to last st.
Join with sl st to beginning chain. 48 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnd 7: hdc in same st. *1 hdc in next 5 sts, 2 hdc in next st*, repeat from * to * around to last st.
Join with sl st to beginning chain. 56 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnd 8: hdc in same st. *1 hdc in next 6 sts, 2 hdc in next st*, repeat from * to * around to last st.
Join with sl st to beginning chain. 64 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnd 9: hdc in same st. *1 hdc in next 7 sts, 2 hdc in next st*, repeat from * to * around to last st.
Join with sl st to beginning chain. 72 hdc total.
ch 1.

rnds 10 - 14: 1 hdc in each st. join with sl st to beginning chain. 72 hdc total.

rnd 15: 1 hdc in each st. join with sl st to beginning. fasten off. 72 hdc total.

rnd 16: Join contrasting color b, chain 1, 1 hdc in each st around. join with sl st to beginning chain. 72 hdc total.

rnd 17: chain 1, 1 hdc in each st around. join with sl st to beginning chain. 72 hdc total.

rnd 18: chain 1, 1 hdc in each st around. join with sl st to beginning chain. fasten off. 72 hdc total.

rnd 19: Join color a, chain 1, 1 hdc in each st around. join with sl st to beginning chain. 72 hdc total.

 
brim round

brim is worked twice. you will have two brims that will be joined together. this will give your brim
thickness and stability.

rnd 20: change to hook size j/10 - 6.00mm. ch 1. hdc in next 24 sts. work a hdc around the posts of the next 26 sts. this is the beginning of the brim.

brim row 1: ch 1, turn. sc in front loops only of next 25 sts. 26 sts total.

brim row 2: ch 1 (counts as 1st sc), turn. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in next 5 sts. 2 scs in next st. sc in next 8 sts. 2 scs in next st. sc in next 5 sts. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in last st. 26 sts total.

brim row 3: ch 1 (counts as 1st sc), turn. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in next 20 sts. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in last st. 24 sts total.

brim row 4: ch 1 (counts as 1st sc), turn. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in next 4 sts. 2 scs in next st. sc in next 8 sts. 2 scs in next st. sc in next 4 sts. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in last st. 24 sts total.

brim row 5: ch 1 (counts as 1st sc), turn. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in next 18 sts. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in last st. 22 sts total.

brim row 6: ch 1 (counts as 1st sc), turn. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in next 3 sts. 2 scs in next st. sc in next 8 sts. 2 scs in next st. sc in next 3 sts. sc dec over next 2 sts. sc in last st. 22 sts total.

fasten off.

2nd brim row 1: join yarn in back loop of 1st st of 1st brim. sc in back loops only of next 25 sts. 26 sts total.

2nd brim row 2 - 6: work brim rows 2 – 6.

fasten off.





join yarn in corner st of brim so that you will be working around the beanie, joining the two brims
together.

working in ends of rows, and around the edge of both brims, sc dec over 1st 2 sts of the corner of the
brim. sc in ends of the next 3 rows. sc in the next 22 sts around the front of the brim. sc in the ends of the next 3 rows on the other side of brim. sc dec in next 2 sts in corner of brim. 30 sts so far...

continuing around the side of the beanie, sc in next 22 sts. join with sl st to beginning chain at back of
beanie.

fasten off.
finish off.

Then add whatever decoration you choose. I made a skull and crossbones for my son.

DIY Science: Homemade Rock Candy

My kids LOVE doing science experiments, especially ones that finish with eating something tasty. This one is fun for even me, because I've always been a fan of rock candy.

How this chemistry experiment works is that:
The water-sugar mixture is saturated at boiling temperature (this means that it cannot dissolve any more sugar). When the mixture lowers in temperature it becomes supersaturated- meaning that it contains more sugar than it should at that temperature. When more sugar is added (the stick/string) at room temperature, the mixture realizes that it has more sugar than it should and the excess sugar crystallizes on the string.

There are many different recipes that you can find on the internet but the basics come down to creating a saturated solution (meaning the water cannot dissolve more sugar).  Most people find that a 2:1 or a 3:1 ratio of sugar to water.

Please remember: While this is a kid oriented and kid friendly experiment, sugar burns are very painful, adult supervision is strongly advised when making the sugar solution.

Rock Candy (2:1 ratio)

You will need:
  • Measuring cup and spoon
  • Large sauce pan
  • Long wooden spoon
  • 2 Clean glass jars (a tall, strong one)
  • 2 Clean pieces of cotton string or wooden sticks
  • Popsicle stick, wooden skewer or clothes pins (to hold string or stick upright and off bottom)
Ingredients
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 cups of granulated sugar (roughly 2 lbs)
  • A few drops of your favorite candy flavoring (optional)
  • A few drops of food coloring - add more than you think you will need (optional)

Directions

  • Prepare your jars by measuring your stick (or thread) so that when attached to the skewer or clothes pin they hang an inch above the bottom, this should prevent your candy from attaching to the bottom.
  • If you can, prepare your skewer (or thread) a day ahead of time. Simply wet it and cover it completely in sugar. Let it dry, strings should be hung so they hang straight. This should help the crystals form once you place the skewer in the jar with the sugar solution.

  1. In your sauce pan bring water to boil. 
  2. Once boiling add sugar slowly, making sure each addition is dissolved before adding more.  
  3. When you get close to the last half cup of sugar start adding it in one tablespoon at a time.
  4. The solution will be saturated when no more sugar will dissolve. 
    • If your solution is not saturated when you've added all of your sugar, you can either boil the solution longer or add more sugar until the solution is saturated. 
    • If you have a candy thermometer the temperature of the solution should reach 240*F.
  5. Remove pan from heat, if you are going to add colorings or flavoring this is when to add it.
    1. After adding the coloring and flavoring stir well to make sure that it is fully combined.
  6. Cool solution for 5-10 minutes.
  7. Pour solution into your jars and hang your stick (or string) into the solution.
  8. Let sit for 5-10 days undisturbed

You will get the largest crystals by:
  • Making a thick sugar solution (remember 2:1 ratio is the suggested minimum)
  • The longer they set, the larger they will grow
Other tips:
  • Glass jars with a hole cut in the lid work great and keep dust from settling into the solution. If you are using a normal glass, you can cover the top with tin foil. (note this may cause smaller crystals as the mixture does not have as much room to evaporate)
  • If the string keeps floating, you can weigh the end down with something. Small pieces of store bought rock candy work best and will make your own crystals start to grow faster.
  • Natural fiber string like cotton or twine will work best. Nylon fiber and other polymer string will not stimulate crystal growth very well. Or you can use sticks (do not get the colored ones because the dye may not be edible!).
Still isn't working? Try these tips from about.com
http://video.about.com/chemistry/3-Tips-for-Growing-Sugar-Crystals.htm

DIY: 4 Dry Shampoo Recipes for both light and dark hair

My hair hates me, plain and simple.
After I wash and dry my hair it looks something like this:
Five products and an hour (or more) of flat ironing my hair it looks like this:
Which wouldn't be too bad, if I could get that result everyday, but it seems if I wash my hair every single day it becomes too dry and even my moisturizing products don't bring it back.

I always thought my choices were set, either wash my hair every day, or end up with dirty nasty hair. That was until my hairdresser told me for my hair type I needed to stop washing my hair every day and start using a dry shampoo. That I should only wash my hair at max 3 times a week. Gross, I thought, my hair is going to be nasty; that was, until I started using it, and let me tell you it worked wonders!
However it did not make my wallet very happy as dry shampoo is exceedingly expensive. So I googled around and it turns out that dry shampoo has been made at home by people for decades, who knew, I certainly didn't. What's even better, is that the ingredients are things I have in my pantry.

So what does dry shampoo do?
Dry shampoo absorbs the oil in your hair that makes it look and feel greasy without drying out your scalp, as well as removing most, if not all, of the dirt in your hair.  As an added bonus it can also give limp locks some added volume.
Remember: dry shampoo is for use on dry hair; and is not a shampoo substitute all together, you should still wash your hair a few times a week.

First things first, remember your hair type.
If you use a dry shampoo for light hair on your dark hair, there is a slight chance that you may end up with some white residue, if you don't want to chance this use one specifically for dark hair.
If you use a dry shampoo for dark hair on your light hair it may temporarily make your locks slightly darker or look dirty.

The "light hair" shampoo can easily be used by both hair types, or as a base for families that have kids of differing shades of hair.




I'm currently a blonde so I use a light hair recipe.

While one of my daughter's is a brunette and she uses a dark hair recipe.




Also, if you have really oily hair, stick to the recipes with ground grains, as the finer products may cling to the oily hair.  Ground grains are easier to brush out of all hair types.
Play with ingredients, see what works best for you
  • Corn meal is sometimes considered one of the "best" ingredients because it is excellent at grabbing dirt, easy to remove and can make hair glossier
  • Cornflour and tapioca starch provide silkiness. 
  • Rice starch and baking soda are more coarse and absorbent. 
  • Baking soda helps absorb odors in the hair as well.
  • Avoid sugar in the cocoa, use baking or dutch process
What you'll need:
Empty "spice" container with "sprinkle" insert
1 recipe of chosen mixture

What to do with it:
  • Mix all the ingredients together thoroughly, pour into your chosen container. 
    • If using essential oils or ground petals, allow to set for a few days so that the sent can be absorbed throughout the ingredients.
  • Over a sink or area you don't mind sweeping, sprinkle mixture onto roots of hair from a height of a few inches.  Gently work through the roots of the hair with a massaging/scrunching motion. 
  • Allow to set a minute or two, then distribute throughout hair with a brush or comb. Allow to set two to three minutes longer. 
  • Flip your head over your sink again and brush your hair out from root to tip.
------
Recipe 1 - for light hair (this is the one I use, but with ground lavender instead of essential oil)
1/2 cup Corn Starch
2 Tbsp Baking Soda
1-2 drops Essential oil (optional)

Recipe 2 - for light hair
2 Tbsp Corn Starch
2 Tbsp Rice Flour
2 Tbsp Arrowroot Powder
6-10 drops Essential oil

Recipe 3 - for light hair
2 Tbsp Corn Starch
2 Tbsp Baking Soda
2 Tbsp Cornmeal
2 Tbsp Ground Oatmeal (ground med to med/fine)

Recipe 4 - for light hair
3 Tbsp Cornmeal
2 Tbsp Baking Soda
1 Tbsp Corn Starch
1-2 drops Essential oil (optional)
---------
Recipe 1 - for dark hair
2 parts Corn Starch
1 part Cocoa Powder
1 part Ground Cinnamon

Recipe 2 - for dark hair (my daughter uses this one, with vanilla)
1/2 cup Cocoa Powder
2 Tbsp Baking Soda
1-2 drops Essential Oil (optional)

Recipe 3 - for dark hair
2 Tbsp Corn Starch
2 Tbsp Rice Flour
2 Tbsp Arrowroot Powder
2 Tbsp Cocoa Powder
6-10 drops Essential Oil

Recipe 4 - for dark hair
1 Tbsp Corn Flour
1 Tbsp Tapioca Starch
2 Tbsp Rice Starch
2 Tbsp Baking Soda
1 Tbsp Cocoa Powder
Essential oil or ground petals/herbs (rosemary, lavender, rose petals)

Friday, April 5, 2013

Upcycling: Large Plarn Bag

This bag is one of my top sellers as everyone loves a big bag that they can take to the beach and not worry about bringing home sand.  They also make great gym/swim bags because the large weave of the bag allows clothes to dry and/or air out.

This bag holds a LOT of stuff, it also stretches due to the size of the bag and the basket-esk weave of the pattern.  I use one to hold 4 (1-lb) skeins of yarn, 4 pattern books and all my hooks.


This is a rough estimation of what I did to make this bag.

What you need: 
One large ball of plarn. - Roughly 56-60 bags.
Hook: “N” size metal hook and “J” for edging


Directions:

Using "N" hook
Ch 28

Rnd 1: Hdc in 2nd ch from hook and in ea chain to end. Work 2 Hdc in end st, then continue working a Hdc in ea st to other end then work 2 Hdc in end st.

Rnd 2: Hdc in each st to first end, work 2 Hdc in the 2 end sts, then Hdc in ea st to other end, then work 2 Hdc in the 2 end sts. Do not connect at end of rounds, just continue working Hdc’s to create a seamless bag.

Rnd 3: Hdc in each st to first end, work 2 Hdc in ea of the 3 end sts, then Hdc in ea st to end, then work 2 Hdc in ea of the 3 end sts.

Rnd 4-14: Hdc in ea st around the entire bag, so that you are at the beginning side of the bag



Rnd 15:  * Ch 1, Sk next st, Hdc in next st * Repeat between * to end of round.

Rnd 16-39 * Hdc in next ch 1 space, Ch 1 * Repeat between * to end of round, you should be at the beginning side of the bag.

Rnd 40: Begin at side of bag, work 2 Hdc in ea ch 1 space around bag.

Rnd 41: Hdc 5, ch 1, turn.

Rnd 43-47: Hdc 10, ch 1, turn.

Rnd 48: Sk 1st st, Hdc in ea remaining st in row, leaving last st unworked. Ch1, turn.

Rnd 49: Hdc in ea st across. (8 total) Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 50: Sk 1st st, Hdc in ea remaining st in row, leaving last st unworked. Ch1, turn.

Rnd 51: Hdc in ea st across. (6 total) Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 52: Sk 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, leaving last st unworked. Ch1, turn..

Rnd 53-82: Hdc in ea st across. (4 total) Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 83: 2 Hdc in 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, and 2 Hdc in last st. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 84-85: Hdc in ea st across. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 86: 2 Hdc in 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, then 2 Hdc in last st. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 87-88: Hdc in ea st across. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 89: 2 Hdc in 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, then 2 Hdc in last st. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 90-94: *Hdc in ea st across. Ch 1, turn* Repeat between* 4 times. Attach handle with a Sl St to body of bag directly opposite current handle side.

Using "J" hook
Sc in ea st along the entire edge of handle and Sl St across to other edge of strap handle. Sc in ea st along the entire edge of handle. This creates a smooth edge on the handle.

Finish off and weave in ends.

Abbreviations:
Ch – Chain
Hdc – Half Double Crochet
Rnd – Round
Sc - Single Crochet
Sl St – Slip Stitch
Sk – Skip
St – Stitch

Upcycling: Medium Plarn Bag

I learned how to crochet using this bag and sort of coming up with a rough pattern after looking at other patterns on the internet.  I wanted something durable yet big. The result was a bag made almost completely out of half-double crochets.

What you need: 
One large ball of plarn. - Roughly 56-60 bags.
Hook: “N” size metal hook and “J” for edging


Directions:

Using "N" hook
Ch 28

Rnd 1: Hdc in 2nd ch from hook and in ea chain to end. Work 2 Hdc in end st, then continue working a Hdc in ea st to other end then work 2 Hdc in end st.

Rnd 2: Hdc in each st to first end, work 2 Hdc in the 2 end sts, then Hdc in ea st to other end, then work 2 Hdc in the 2 end sts. Do not connect at end of rounds, just continue working Hdc’s to create a seamless bag.

Rnd 3: Hdc in each st to first end, work 2 Hdc in ea of the 3 end sts, then Hdc in ea st to end, then work 2 Hdc in ea of the 3 end sts.

Rnd 4-38: Hdc in ea st around the entire bag, so that you are at the beginning side of the bag

Rnd 39: Hdc 5, ch 1, turn.

Rnd 40-45: Hdc 10, ch 1, turn.

Rnd 46: Sk 1st st, Hdc in ea remaining st in row, leaving last st unworked. Ch1, turn.

Rnd 48: Hdc in ea st across. (8 total) Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 49: Sk 1st st, Hdc in ea remaining st in row, leaving last st unworked. Ch1, turn.

Rnd 50: Hdc in ea st across. (6 total) Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 51: Sk 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, leaving last st unworked. Ch1, turn..

Rnd 51-80: Hdc in ea st across. (4 total) Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 81: 2 Hdc in 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, and 2 Hdc in last st. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 82-83: Hdc in ea st across. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 84: 2 Hdc in 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, then 2 Hdc in last st. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 85-86: Hdc in ea st across. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 87: 2 Hdc in 1st st, then Hdc in ea remaining st in row, then 2 Hdc in last st. Ch 1, turn.

Rnd 88-91: Hdc in ea st across. Ch 1, turn (x4). Attach handle with a Sl St to body of bag directly opposite current handle side.

Using "J" hook
Sc in ea st along the entire edge of handle and Sl St across to other edge of strap handle. Sc in ea st along the entire edge of handle. This creates a smooth edge on the handle.

Finish off and weave in ends.

Abbreviations:
Ch – Chain
Hdc – Half Double Crochet
Rnd – Round
Sc - Single Crochet
Sl St – Slip Stitch
Sk – Skip
St – Stitch